Department of PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

Syllabus for
Master of Arts (Public Policy)
Academic Year  (2021)

 
1 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MPP131 POLICY ANALYSIS AND PROCESSES 4 4 100
MPP132 GOVERNANCE, POLITY AND CONSTITUTION 4 4 100
MPP133 STATE, MARKET AND ECONOMY 4 4 100
MPP134 SOCIO-ECONOMIC HISTORY OF INDIA 4 4 100
MPP135 GEO- POLITICAL DETERMINANTS OF PUBLIC POLICY 4 4 100
MPP136 ETHICS IN PUBLIC POLICY 4 4 100
MPP151 SKILL ENHANCEMENT-I 3 3 50
2 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
MPP231 TECHNOLOGY AND PUBLIC POLICY 4 4 100
MPP232 RURAL DEVELOPMENT POLICY 4 4 100
MPP233 PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 4 4 100
MPP234 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES OF SOCIAL CHANGE-I 4 4 100
MPP235 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 4 4 100
MPP236 ADVANCED ECONOMICS-I 4 4 100
MPP251 SKILL ENHANCEMENT-II 3 3 50
      

    

Department Overview:

Department of Professional Studies (DPS) offers some of the most unique and inter-disciplinary courses in the field of commerce and management. It was established in the year 2002 as Centre for Career Advancement (CCA), and later upgraded to Department of Professional Studies in 2007. The department aims at professional training for wider career opportunities. This is achieved through value enhancement programmes (Add-on courses and programmes) along with the academic degrees to equip the students to meet the challenges and prospects of contemporary academia and the corporate sector. All courses of the department are conducted by academicians and highly qualified practicing professionals Soft Skills and Activity Sessions (SSA) are a compulsory component of every programme of the department and is assigned to make the students excel in soft skills, team work, communication, public speaking, debates, general knowledge etc. By the end of third year of UG and second year of PG, each student is expected to conduct at least two training sessions as a professional trainer in the other departments of the university or in other institutions.

Mission Statement:

Vision- To develop into a centre of excellence in education, training and research in the field of commerce and management

Introduction to Program:

Master of Public Policy Program in Christ (Deemed to be University) will enable students to obtain an in-depth understanding of public policy and perform effectively in contemporary political, economic, and social environment in a coherent and comprehensive manner. The interdisciplinary curriculum equips students to create social impact at local, national and global levels and also prepare for Civil Service examination in India. Students would develop quantitative, qualitative and analytical skills, and receive substantive exposure to the real-world policy making processes

Program Objective:

PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES:

 

Ø  To create a class of public policy professionals with the ability to work both within the public service system in India and on a global stage

Ø 

Assesment Pattern

The marks distribution for attendance is as follows:

95 – 100%       -           5 marks

90 – 94%         -           4 marks

85 – 89%         -           3 marks

80 – 84%         -           2 marks

76 – 79%         -           1 mark

 

Grading Pattern:

Grading pattern will be the same as approved by the University for UG Courses as detailed herein below:

Percentage

Grade

Grade Point

Interpretation

Class

80 and Above

A+

  4.00

Outstanding

First Class with Distinction

73-79

A

3.67

Excellent

First Class

66-72

A-

  3.33

Very Good

First Class

60-65

B+

  3.00

Good

First Class

55-59

B

  2.67

Average

Second Class

50-54

C+

  2.33

Satisfactory

Second Class

45-49

C

2.00

Pass

Pass Class

40-44

D

  1.00

Pass

Pass Class

39 and Below

F

    0

Fail

Fail

 

Examination And Assesments

Question Paper Pattern for the End Semester Examination:

The question paper pattern for the End Semester Examination is as follows:

Sections

Type

Marks

A

Conceptual / Descriptive Type questions

6 x 2 = 12

B

Conceptual / Descriptive Type questions

5 x 5 =  25

C

Analytical / Essay Type Questions

3 x 15 = 45

D

Case Study

1 x 18 = 18

 

         Section A

Conceptual / Descriptive Type questions 6 out of 8 questions of 2 mark each.

         Section B

Analytical / Essay type questions with choice – 5 out of 7 questions of 5 marks each

         Section C

Analytical/ Essay type questions with choice – 3 out of 5 questions of 15 marks each

         Section D

One Compulsory Question – 18 marks

 

Continuous Internal Assessments (CIA):

CIA – 1 and 3 : Continuous Internal Assessment

Written (reports) – Group or Individual, Understanding of the subjects, Participative learning, Presentation and VIVA, Quiz, Multiple choice based test etc.

CIA – 2:  Continuous Internal Assessment - Mid Semester Exam (MSE)

Mid Semester Exam marks will be taken for Internal Assessment. MSE marks will be reduced to 25 for this purpose. The question paper pattern for the Mid Semester Examination is as follows:

Sections

Type

Marks

A

Short Answer Questions

4 x 2 = 8

B

Conceptual / Descriptive Type questions

2 x 5 = 10

C

Analytical / Essay Type Questions

1 x 15 = 15

D

Case Study

1 x 17 = 17

 

 

MPP131 - POLICY ANALYSIS AND PROCESSES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic concepts, theories and models of public policy analysis. 

Learning Outcome

On completing the course students will be able to:

1.     Use proven methods and frameworks to analyse key policies

2.     Identify and explain the key determinants of policy making

3.     Evaluate the potential outcomes and effects of public policies

4.  Understand and apply various approaches to policy-making

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Historical and Structural Contexts of Public Policy Making
 

Introduction to Public Policy, Attributes, Definitions and Relevance of Public Policy, Policy Inputs, Outputs and Outcomes, Typologies, Policy Cycle, Bardach’s Eightfold Path to Problem Solving and Policy Analysis: Constraints in Policy Making

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Problem Emergence
 

Identification of issue, Framing of Problem, Problem of definition and assembling of evidence, Writing a Problem statement, Policy problems as market and governmental failure, Distributional and Other Goals

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Agenda Setting
 

Brewer’s initiation, Identification of the problem context, Communication of Problem , Focusing Events, The policy agenda: Public Agenda vs. Institutional agenda. Kingdon’s Window of Opportunity Model; Policy communities, Pluralism vs Elitism. Rational Model

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Policy Formulation
 

 

Determination of goals and objectives. Constructing Alternatives and Selecting Criteria.. Analysis and Authorization. Prediction of outputs, outcomes and consequences. Criteria Alternatives Matrix and other models. Selection of Policy choice and confronting trade-offs. Use of design thinking in evaluation of policy alternatives. Insights from behavioral economics.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Techniques and Models of Policy implementation
 

 

Top-down approach to implementation. The implementation game. Bottom-up approach. Street level bureaucrats, Challenges involved, Conditions for Successful Implementation. Role of various agencies and institutions in policy implementation. Incremental Model. Public Sector Strategic Planning. Dimensions of Policy Implementation

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Policy Review and evaluation
 

Policy Impact, Evaluation and Change. Criteria for Evaluation. Types and methods of evaluation, Cost Benefit Analysis, Management by Objectives (MBO), Operations Research, Programme Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT) & Critical path Method (CPM).

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     Weimer, D. L., & Vining, A. R. (2011). Policy analysis: Concepts and practice. Boston: Longman.

2.     Mintrom, Michael. (2007). Public Policy: The Competitive Framework - by Ewen J. Michael. Australian Journal of Public Administration - AUST J PUBL ADM. 66. 387-388. 10.1111/j.1467-8500.2007.00550_7.x.j.

3.     Bardach, Eugene (2011). A Practical Guide for Policy Analysis: The Eightfold Path to More Effective Problem Solving. CQ Press College.

4.     Birkland, Thomas A. (2011). Policy Process: Theories, Concepts, and Models of Policy Making. Routledge.

5.     Bhuyan, Jorgensen and Sharma (2010), ‘Taking the Pulse of Policy: The Policy Implementation Assessment Tool’, U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), p.7.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     DeLeon, Peter & DeLeon, Linda (2002). What Ever Happened to Policy Implementation?  An Alternative Approach. Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory,12 (4), pp. 467-492.

2.     Simeon, R. (1976). Studying Public Policy. Canadian Journal of Political Science / Revue Canadienne De Science Politique, 9(4), 548-580

3.     Mintrom, M., & Luetjens, J. (2016). Design thinking in policymaking processes: Opportunities and challenges. Australian Journal of Public Administration, 75(3), 391-402

4.     Kingdon, John. ‘Agendas, Alternatives, and Public Policies, ‘Update Edition (2nd Edition) (Longman Classics in Political Science), Pearson

5.     Lipsky, Michael (2010). Street Level Bureaucracy: Dilemma of the Individual in Public

Services. Russell Sage Foundation.

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessment. Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

End Semester Examination (ESE)                                      :           50%

Mid Semester Examination (CIA-2)                                   :           25%

Continuous Internal Assessments (CIA- 1 & 3)                 :           20%

Attendance                                                                             :           05%

Total                                                   :          100%                         

·         Written Examinations consists of:

Mid Semester Exam – 50 marks (2 hours duration)

End Semester Exam – 100 marks (3 hours duration)

·         A student should have secured minimum 40% marks in the ESE to pass in that paper.

·         In aggregate for each paper, for internal and end semester put together, at least 40 marks out of 100 must be secured to pass in that paper

MPP132 - GOVERNANCE, POLITY AND CONSTITUTION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course reinforces and establishes the importance of governance, polity and constitutional provisions in policy design and implementation

Learning Outcome

On completing the course students will be able to:

1.     Evaluate the role of key government policies and interventions

2.     Identify and explain the features and provisions of Indian Constitution

3.     Discuss concepts in transparency and accountability of policy-makers

Understand the role of various stakeholders in the policy process

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Constitutional framework
 

Historical Background, Making of the Constitution, Salient Features, Amenability of the Preamble, Citizenship and fundamental rights, The impact of CAA, DPSP, Fundamental Duties and Basic Structure. Relevant Judgements.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
Government Structure
 

Parliamentary and Federal System, Central and State government functions. SC judgements limiting role of government. Local Government and government in Special Areas. Scheduled and Tribal Areas. Key Constitutional and non-constitutional bodies including Election Commission, GST Council, NITI Aayog and Information Commission (RTI). Accountability

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Policy Dimensions in the Constitution
 

Constitutional provisions and amendments on Language, tribes, class and caste. Policy shifts leading to important constitutional amendments. The emergence of regional issues and the rise of regional political parties. Electoral issues and Pressure Groups that impact policy and constitutional provisions. People’s Representation Act

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Governance framework in India
 

The role of NGOs, SHGs, FPOs various groups and associations, donors, charities, institutional and other stakeholders. Relevant schemes such as Bank Linkage Programme (SBLP) Impact of Covid-19 on the functioning of these bodies.  

Transparency and accountability. Emergence and need for corporate governance

E-governance: Applications and Models. Successes limitations and potential citizens charters, Digital Revolution

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Policy interventions and Welfare Schemes
 

Centrally sponsored schemes. Aadhar Foreign aid and the role of FDI in ‘good governance’ projects. Lesson from experiences of Power, rail and other administered sectors. Welfare schemes for vulnerable sections of the population by centre and states.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Review and evaluation of Governance Programmes
 

Performance of welfare schemes. Issues relating to the development and management of Social Sector/Services. Issues relating to poverty and hunger. Review of programmes in place addressing these issues

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     Laxmikanth, M. (2019). Indian Polity (6th ed.). McGraw-Hill.

2.     Ministry of Finance, Government of India, 2021. "Economic Survey 2020-21"

3.     Kapur, D., & Mehta, B. P. (2007). Public Institutions in India: Performance and Design (Oxford India Collection (Paperback)). Oxford University Press.

4.     Laxmikanth, M. (2014). Governance in India. McGraw Hill Education (India) Private Limited.

5.     Committee, C. D. O. C. P. S. F. I. (2012). Select constitutions of the world. Ulan Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     Corbridge, S., Williams, G., Srivastava, M., & Véron, R. (2005). Seeing the State: Governance and Governmentality in India (Contemporary South Asia, Series Number 10) (Illustrated ed.). Cambridge University Press.

2.     Desai, M. (2017). The Raisina Model: Indian Democracy at 70. Penguin Random House India Private Limited, 2017.

O’Brien, D. (2015). Derek Introduces The Constitution and Parliament of India. Rupa Publications Private Limited.

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessment. Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

End Semester Examination (ESE)                                      :           50%

Mid Semester Examination (CIA-2)                                   :           25%

Continuous Internal Assessments (CIA- 1 & 3)                 :           20%

Attendance                                                                             :           05%

Total                                                   :          100%                         

·         Written Examinations consists of:

Mid Semester Exam – 50 marks (2 hours’ duration)

End Semester Exam – 100 marks (3 hours’ duration)

·         A student should have secured minimum 40% marks in the ESE to pass in that paper.

·         In aggregate for each paper, for internal and end semester put together, at least 40 marks out of 100 must be secured to pass in that paper

MPP133 - STATE, MARKET AND ECONOMY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic concepts, theories and models of economics, market and the state which are relevant to public policy

Learning Outcome

On completing the course students will be able to:

1.     Define and remember basic concepts of economics applicable to public projects

2.     Explain and identify key factors affecting/ determining market variables

3.     Compare and evaluate different economic Policies in India

4.  Describe and evaluate trends in State policy

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Economic Reform in Ancient and medieval India
 

Economic relations according to Arthashastra and Milinda-panho, Mauryan Economy and the rise of guilds, Monetisation, peasant production and urbanisation

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Factors affecting Development
 

Poverty, Inequality and Unemployment. Definitions, causes; measurement and status, The role of the state. Market Intervention.
Agriculture. Policies attempting to revolutionize agriculture.
Jobless Growth in India: Reasons and Consequences

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Agenda Setting through Monetary & Fiscal Policy
 

Monetary Policy in India: Inflation, deflation, Recessionary and Inflationary Scenarios. Monetary Policy tools and Money Supply in India. Banks and Financial Markets; Privatization and Reforms in Banking and Insurance, fiscal multipliers, compensatory fiscal policy, functional finance approach, fiscal policy for inflation, full employment and economic growth

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Policy Formulation, Planning and the Budget
 

Development models:
The Role of the State in the Economy. The Government Budget: Revenue Budget, Capital Budget, Government Deficits. Budgetary procedure in India. Types of Budgets in India. Budget 2021 analysis
: Economic Planning in India , Planning commission v/s NITI Aayog, Five Year Plans, Centre state Finance Relations, Finance commission in India. LPG policy in India.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Policy interventions and Economic Policy
 

Agriculture: Electronic Markets, PPP-model,  Farm Bills, 
Money: The impact of Demonetization on the economy. Role of Covid-19 on Economic Policy Socio-Economics: Development Poverty eradication programmes, poverty and resource policy, tribal rights and issues, livelihood mission. MNERGS, MSMEs,
International Economics: Make in India, industrial corridors, black money, international treaties and organisations, India’s policies with neighbours.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:12
Review and evaluation of Economic Programmes
 

Distributive impact of economic policies, development versus growth, determinant of growth and development: HPI/MPI, HDI, PQLI, GEM, GDI/GII, TAI, Green index, sustainable development, India’s ranking in the various indices

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     Singh, R. (2021). INDIAN ECONOMY 11/ED. McGraw Hill Education.

2.     Verma, S. (2021). The Indian Economy . . .An Analysis of Economic Survey 2019–20 & Budget 2020–21. Unique Publishers India Private Limited.

3.     Kapila, U. (2021). Understanding the Problems of Indian Economy. Academic Foundation.

4.     Sharma, R.S. and D.N. Jha, (1974), ‘The Economic History of India up to A.D.1200: Trends and Prospects’, Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient, vol. 17

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     Lindsey, B., Teles, S. M., Compton, S., & Audio, T. (2018). The Captured Economy: How the Powerful Enrich Themselves, Slow Down Growth, and Increase Inequality. Tantor Audio.

2.   Ashwani, D. G. M. (2017). Indian Economy, 72nd Edition. S CHAND & Company Limited.

3. Bellinger, W. K. (2015). The Economic Analysis of Public Policy (2nd ed.). Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessment. Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

End Semester Examination (ESE)                                      :           50%

Mid Semester Examination (CIA-2)                                   :           25%

Continuous Internal Assessments (CIA- 1 & 3)                 :           20%

Attendance                                                                             :           05%

Total                                                   :          100%                         

·         Written Examinations consists of:

Mid Semester Exam – 50 marks (2 hours’ duration)

End Semester Exam – 100 marks (3 hours’ duration)

·         A student should have secured minimum 40% marks in the ESE to pass in that paper.

·         In aggregate for each paper, for internal and end semester put together, at least 40 marks out of 100 must be secured to pass in that paper

MPP134 - SOCIO-ECONOMIC HISTORY OF INDIA (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to important concepts in the field of Indian History necessary for formulation of effective policy-making in India

Learning Outcome

On completing the course students will be able to:

1.     Analyse the role of historical factors in policies and interventions

2.     Discuss socio-economic concepts that characterize Indian Society

3.     Identify historical factors that shape policy making

4.  Understand non-human considerations of the policy process

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
The shaping of Indian Society in Ancient India
 

Stone Age, Palaeolithic Age, Mesolithic Age, Neolithic Age and Chalcolithic Age: Important incidents.

Indus Valley civilization: Society, Religion Important Harappan towns & artifacts excavated. Town Planning. Geographical distribution and characteristics of pastoral and farming communities outside the Indus region,  Economical Importance. Political Life. Causes of decline

Aryan Civilization: Origin. Vedic literature. Religion & Society. Polity. Economic Conditions. The evolution of monarchy and varna system.

Difference between Indus and Aryan

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
The shaping of religious thought
 

Jainism & Buddhism: About Mahavira & teachings. Buddha teachings. Councils. Important books and literature. Causes for decline

Sufi and Bhakti religious movements, their sequence and socio-economic impact

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Formation of Economic and social structure in Early medieval India
 

The Mauryan Empire: The significance of Ashoka. Administration and Society. Art and Architecture.
The influx of other cultures: Indo- Greeks. Shakas. Pacthians Article and Architecture and the Kushans
South India formations: Sangam Age. Satavahanas. Chola's and Pallavas. Culture, Society, Art 
and architecture

Gupta Empire: Administration and social development. Art and Architecture. Post-Gupta period. Important figures.and the Fendal System 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Agenda setting of Monarchies in Medieval India
 

Major political developments in Northern India and the Peninsula, origin and the rise of Rajputs; The Cholas: administration, village economy and society; “Indian Feudalism”
Administration and policy decisions by Delhi Sultanate: Aibek, Iltumish, Balban, Aluddin Khilji, Mohamad bin Tughlug, Feroz Tughlug, Sikandu lodi, Ibrahim Lodi.
Polity and Policy in the Deccan: Vijayanagar Empire. Krishna Devaraya in detail. Creation of temples and literature
Economy and Society
: Mughals: Babar, Akbar, Jehangir, Shahjahan and Aurangazeb in detail

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Policy Intervention and formulation under British Rule
 

Economy, administration and decline of the Marathas and the Peshwas. Policy intervention by European powers in India
Policy formulation by the East India Company. Important Governor Generals. Early administrative structure; From diarchy to direct control;
British policy impact on India

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
British Policy Implementation and Social Awakening
 

British expansion and resistance: Economic Impact of the British Raj; land revenue settlements (zamindari, ryotwari, mahalwari); Deindustrialisation; Railways and commercialisation of agriculture; Growth of landless labour. Indian Renaissance, social and religious reform movement. Reform Movements.

Policy shaping events: 1857 Revolt. Freedom Struggle and the formation of INC. Moderates and Extremists. Partition Role of Bengal/Surat Split. Formation of Muslim league and Hindu Mahasabha. Lucknow pact. Minto Morley/Montagu Chelmsford

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Actors in the policy process during Colonial rule
 

Gandhian Policy Reactions: Non Cooperation Movement. Civil dis-obedience movement. Gandhi - Irwin Pact. August Offer. Quit India Movement. Cripps mission. Cabinet Committee, Subash Chandra Bose and INA formation in detail. Indian National Congress, meetings and resolutions

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:4
Policy outcomes post-independence
 

Indian independence to 1964. A parliamentary, secular, democratic (republic the 1950 Constitution). Jawaharlal Nehru’s vision of a developed, socialist society. Planning and state-controlled industrialization. Agrarian reforms. The foreign policy of Non-alignment

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

1.     1.     Sharma, R. (2006). India's ancient past. Oxford University Press.

 

2.    2.  Chandra, S., & Sharma, R. (2018). History of Medieval India. Orient black swan and Oxford India.

 

3.     3. Das S.K. (2007). Economic History of Ancient India. Vohra Publishers & Distributors, Delhi.

 

4.     4. Ahir, R. (2020). A Brief History of Modern India. Spectrum Books Pvt. Ltd.

5. Chandra, B. (2020). History of Modern India. Orient blackswan pvt ltd

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     Chandra, M. (1977). Trade and trade routes in ancient India. Abhinav Publications.

2.     Thapar, R. (1990). From lineage to state: social formation in the mid-first millennium BC in the Ganga valley. Oxford University Press.

3.     Trautmann, T. (2005). The Aryan Debate. Oxford University Press

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessment. Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

End Semester Examination (ESE)                                      :           50%

Mid Semester Examination (CIA-2)                                   :           25%

Continuous Internal Assessments (CIA- 1 & 3)                 :           20%

Attendance                                                                             :           05%

Total                                                   :          100%                         

·         Written Examinations consists of:

Mid Semester Exam – 50 marks (2 hours’ duration)

End Semester Exam – 100 marks (3 hours’ duration)

·         A student should have secured minimum 40% marks in the ESE to pass in that paper.

·         In aggregate for each paper, for internal and end semester put together, at least 40 marks out of 100 must be secured to pass in that paper

MPP135 - GEO- POLITICAL DETERMINANTS OF PUBLIC POLICY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to vital geographical factors that influence the policy process

Learning Outcome

On completing the course students will be able to:

1.     Analyse the geographical considerations in policy making

2.     Discuss key geo-politcial concepts inherent in policy discussions

3.     Identify geographical factors that shape policy making

4. Understand geographical considerations of the policy process

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Global Geo-political factors
 

Major natural regions. Regional geography of developed countries. Regional geography of developing countries. Regional geography of South Asia

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Indian Geo-political factors
 

Major natural regions. Regional geography of developed countries. Regional geography of developing countries. Regional geography of South Asia

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Agendas of Geographical Policy
 

Geomorphology. Climatology, Oceanography & Biogeography. Landforms formed by fluvial, aeolian and glacial actions. Major climatic types. Major biomes of the world, Environmental degradation and conservation

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
: Geographical determinants of Policy formulation
 

Man & environment and their interrelationship and the growth and development, Population, tribes, migration; Population policies. Economic activities – agriculture, manufacturing, industries, tertiary activities, Settlements & urbanisation, functional classification of towns. Economic Infrastructure

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Geo-political policy implementation
 

Related SDGs. Energy conservation. Red-listing of Species. Government schemes in Agriculture. Interlinking of rivers. Global policy interventions.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Policy review through geographical lens
 

Environmental degradation and conservation. Changes in Human Geography, Demographics. Census 2011. Considerations for Census 2021. Distribution of key natural resources. HDI. Economic and ecological impacts of policy decisions. Green Budget India

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     Husain, M. (2020). Geography of India. McGraw Hill Education (India).

2.     Chandra, R.(2009). A Geography of Population: Concepts, Determinants and Pattern. 8th ed. Kalyani Publications.

3.     Knowles, R. and Wareing, J. (1990). Economic and Social Geography – Made Simple. 1st ed. Elsevier.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     Khullar, D. (2021). Physical, Human and Economic Geography. Access Publishing

2.  Nerurkar, P. A., & Pavate, A. A. (2019). Mastering Geography India and World: Geography India and World (UPSC). Independently published.

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessment. Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

End Semester Examination (ESE)                                      :           50%

Mid Semester Examination (CIA-2)                                   :           25%

Continuous Internal Assessments (CIA- 1 & 3)                 :           20%

Attendance                                                                             :           05%

Total                                                   :          100%                         

·         Written Examinations consists of:

Mid Semester Exam – 50 marks (2 hours’ duration)

End Semester Exam – 100 marks (3 hours’ duration)

·         A student should have secured minimum 40% marks in the ESE to pass in that paper.

·         In aggregate for each paper, for internal and end semester put together, at least 40 marks out of 100 must be secured to pass in that paper

 

MPP136 - ETHICS IN PUBLIC POLICY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course establishes the importance of ethics in policy-making and orients students with fundamental concepts in the field of ethics

Learning Outcome

On completing the course students will be able to:

1.     Understand ethical considerations of policies

2.     Identify and explain the ethical factors of policies in redistribution

3.     Analyze the need for ethics for in various state policies

4. Discuss the role of various stakeholders in the policy process

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Theoretical Frameworks for Ethical Analysis
 

Utilitarianism and Morality: The Social Contract Theory and Distributive justice; The trolley problem and consequentialism. Rawls’ Theory of Justice.
Contributions of moral thinkers and philosophers from India and the world to the concepts of morality

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Ethical framework for Public Policy
 

Essence, Determinants and Consequences of Ethics in - Human Actions; Dimensions of Ethics; Human Values - Lessons from the Lives and Teachings of Great Leaders, Reformers and Administrators; Role of Family Society and Educational Institutions in Inculcating Values

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Ethical Issues in Public Administration
 

Status and Problems; Ethical Concerns and Dilemmas in Government and Private Institutions; Laws, Rules, Regulations and Conscience as Sources of Ethical Guidance; Accountability and Ethical Governance; Strengthening of Ethical and Moral Values in Governance; Ethical Issues in International Relations and Funding; Corporate Governance.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Agenda-setting for Civil Service
 

Aptitude and Foundational Values, Integrity, Impartiality and Non-partisanship, Objectivity, Dedication to Public Service, Empathy, Tolerance and Compassion towards the weaker-sections. Emotional Intelligence-Concepts, and their Utilities and Application in Administration and Governance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Policy intervention in Public Service
 

Basis of Governance and Probity; Information Sharing and Transparency in Government, Right to Information, Codes of Ethics, Codes of Conduct, Citizen’s Charters, Work Culture, Quality of Service Delivery, Utilization of Public Funds, Challenges of Corruption

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:12
Policy Review through lens of ethics
 

Content, structure, function; its influence and relation with thought and behaviour; moral and political attitudes; social influence and persuasion.
Review of CAA. Review of Privatization of economy. Ethical considerations of major global and local policies

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     Sandel, M. J. (2010). Justice: What’s The Right Thing To Do? (1st ed.). Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

2.     Upadhyay, R. (2019). Ethics, Integrity, and Aptitude in Governance (First ed.). SAGE Publications Pvt. Ltd.

3.     Kumar, N. (2020). Lexicon for Ethics, Integrity & Aptitude - 6th Paper Edition. Chronicle books.

4.     Second Administrative Reforms Commission. (2007, January). Ethics in Governance (fourth report). Government of India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     Sen, Amartya, (1979). “Utilitarianism and Welfarism”. The Journal of Philosophy. (Vol. 76, No. 9, September). pp 463-489.

2.     Walzer, Michael, (1973). “Political Action: The Problem of Dirty Hands”, Philosophy & Public Affairs, Vol. 2, No. 2 (Winter), pp. 160-180. Wiley-Blackwell Stable

3.     Bethke, Elshtain , Jean, (1974), “Moral Woman and Immoral Man: A Consideration of the Public-Private Split and Its Political Ramifications” - https://doi.org/10.1177/003232927400400402.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessment. Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

Students are evaluated on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessment. Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

MPP151 - SKILL ENHANCEMENT-I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to equip students with the necessary skills for effective policy making and efficient policy management

Learning Outcome

On completing the course students will be able to:

1.     Use important tools of policy analysis

2.     Evaluate the potential outcomes and effects of policies

3. Interpret data to provide efficient policy recommendations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Comprehension
 

Writing skills, Breivity in communication, vocabulary.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Interpersonal skills including communication skills.
 

Interpersonaal skills in administrative role..

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Logical reasoning and analytical ability.
 

Logical reasoning and analytical ability to cater to competetive exams.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Decision-making and problem-solving
 

Decision-making and problem-solving in competitive exams.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
General mental ability.
 

General mental ability useful to qualify competitive exams

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Basic numeracy and Data interpretation
 

Basic numeracy and Data interpretation skills useful in competitive exams.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     Pandey, M. K. (2012). Analytical Reasoning (3rd ed.). Bsc.

2. Aggarwal, R. S. (2021). A Modern Approach to Verbal & Non-Verbal Reasoning. S Chand.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     Rahman, F. (2012). Decision Making & Problem Solving and Interpersonal Skills. Upkar.

Evaluation Pattern

Total marks:50 Marks

CIA 1- 10 marks

CIA 2:25 marks

CIA 3: 10 Marks

Attendance:5 Marks

MPP231 - TECHNOLOGY AND PUBLIC POLICY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course orients students with emerging and innovative technological inputs of the policy cycle and associated impacts

Learning Outcome

On completing the course students will be able to:

1.     1. Discuss the impact of technological intervention on policy-making.

2.   2.    Analyze the priorities for use of technology and dedication of resources.

3.    3.  Understand the constraints inherent in digitalization and shift to technological processes.

4. Identify potential policy gaps that technology can bridge.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Framework for Technological Development
 

Developments in Science and Technology Applications of scientific developments in everyday life. Effects of scientific developments in everyday life. The impact of Globalization in exchange of knowledge and advancement of technology

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Technological advancements
 

Scientific Advancements: Dark Matter, Higgs Boson. Rare Earth Elements
Applied Science: GM Crops, Gene Editing, Changes in the field of agriculture triggered by science based technologies
Emerging technologies: Artificial Intelligence, Space Technology & Defence Technology
Important contributions of Indians in Science and Technology. Indigenization of technology. Developing new technology indigenously

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Policy issues with Technology
 

Scientific Advancements: Dark Matter, Higgs Boson. Rare Earth Elements
Applied Science: GM Crops, Gene Editing, Changes in the field of agriculture triggered by science based technologies
Emerging technologies: Artificial Intelligence, Space Technology & Defence Technology
Important contributions of Indians in Science and Technology. Indigenization of technology. Developing new technology indigenously

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
Agenda and Priorities for technology policy
 

Security: Technology to stop extremism. Linkages between development and spread of extremism. Role of state and non-state actors in creating challenges to internal security
Challenges to Internal Security through communication networks: Basics of Cyber Security
Role of media and social networking sites in internal security challenges.
Recent policy shifts to curb these platforms.  IRNSS Programme
Crime: Money laundering and its prevention. Technology to detect. Linkages of organized crime with terrorism. Various Security forces and agencies and their mandates. Shift to digital warfare

Covid-19: Dedication of technological resources to management, vaccination and logistics surrounding the virus

Other priorities: Impact of technology on biopharma, Thermal power, Digital India Programme for farmers

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Technology Policy interventions and implementation
 

Digitalization of government services. Shift to Digital India. Associated Policies

India’s gross expenditure in R&D, Policies on Research parks technology business incubators (TBIs) and (RPs).National Artificial Intelligence Strategy, MOUs with foreign research centres, Indian Institutes of Information Technology laws (Amendment) Bill, 2020.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Global trends of Technology policy
 

AI, Blockchain, Machine learning, Data sciences e-gov, economics and regulation of platforms. Global case studies of innovative policies in regards to the technological revolution in education, health, culture, social and economic policies, security and defense

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     Rajaram, K. (2014). Science and Technology in India. Spectrum.

2.     Agrahari, R. (2018). Science And Technology. MC GRAW HILL EDUCATION PVT LTD

3.     Niti Aayog. (2021). Connected Commerce: Creating a Roadmap for a Digitally Inclusive Bharat. Niti Aayog.

4.     Second administrative reforms commission. (2008, June). Combatting terrorism protecting by righteousness (8th report). Government of India.

Indian Institutes of Information Technology Laws (Amendment) Bill, 2020

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     Ellig, J. (2001). Dynamic Competition And Public Policy: Technology, Innovation, and Antitrust Issues (1st ed.). Cambridge University Press.

Edler, J., Cunningham, P., Gök, A., & Shapira, P. (2016). Handbook of Innovation Policy Impact (Eu-SPRI Forum on Science, Technology and Innovation Policy series). Edward Elgar Pub.

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessment. Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

End Semester Examination (ESE)                                      :           50%

Mid Semester Examination (CIA-2)                                   :           25%

Continuous Internal Assessments (CIA- 1 & 3)                 :           20%

Attendance                                                                             :           05%

Total                                                   :          100%                         

·         Written Examinations consists of:

Mid Semester Exam – 50 marks (2 hours’ duration)

End Semester Exam – 100 marks (3 hours’ duration)

·         A student should have secured minimum 40% marks in the ESE to pass in that paper.

·         In aggregate for each paper, for internal and end semester put together, at least 40 marks out of 100 must be secured to pass in that paper

MPP232 - RURAL DEVELOPMENT POLICY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course familiarizes students with key concepts in agricultural and rural transformation and the associated policy making process

Learning Outcome

On completing the course students will be able to:

1.     Understand the dynamics of political, economic and social change in rural India

2.     Analyze problems of rural India in a theoretical and historical framework

3.     Identify key determinants of efficiency of government programmes in the rural sector

           4. Discuss the role of various stakeholders in the rural policy process

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Post-independence framework of Rural Reform
 

Agrarian Crisis; Land Policy; Agricultural Labour; Rural Credit Policy; Non-Farm Sector. Agrarian Economy after Independence Agrarian and Land Reforms; Green Revolution and Class Structure of Rural India; 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Problems in Rural Development
 

Economic Reforms: Issues related to planning, Mobilization of resources, Growth, Development & Employment in rural sector
Agriculture and Rural Society; Issues related to direct and indirect farm subsidies. Issues related to Minimum Support Prices. Public Distribution System: objectives and status. Issues related to buffer stocks and food security. Economics of Animal rearing

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Agenda of Rural policy formulation
 

Welfare Policies, Education, Public health and Sanitation, Women empowerment, Infrastructure development (electricity, irrigation, etc.), Facilities for agriculture extension and research, Availability of credit, Employment opportunities. Related Policies

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
: Policy Formulation and implementation
 

Agriculture: Credit and marketing in rural areas, Agricultural market system, Emerging alternative marketing channels, Issues related to transport and marketing of agricultural produce. E- technology in the aid of farmers.  Diversification into productive activities, Farm Mechanization and creation of sustainable value chains. E-NAM and FPOs. Emergence of organic farming 

Education and Employment Policies specific to rural sector. Inclusive growth. Issues arising from or related to inclusive growth. Effects of Liberalization on the economy. Effects of changes in industrial policy on rural development

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Policy intervention through PPP in Rural Sector
 

SAP and IMF, Neo-liberal approach and New Public Management. Global Experience of PPP in rural development. India approach:  Hub-and-spoke model and the role of PPP in micro-irrigation. PPP vs FPCs

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:12
The role of institutions in Rural development
 

NABARD, Key Policies of the Central and State Government, Panchayat Raj Institutions (PRIs), Co—operative Institutions Co-operative banks, Commercial banks and Regional Rural Banks. Global bodies and models of development: China ( New Rural Reconstruction Movement ) and the four asian tigers.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     Borras Jr., S.M., Kay, Cristóbal & Akram-Lodhi, A. Haroon, (2007), Agrarian Reform and Rural Development: Historical Overview and Current Issues, ISS/UNDP Land, Poverty and Public Action Policy Paper No. 1, The Hague: ISS.

2.     Bhattacharya, Neeladri (2003). Labouring Histories: Agrarian Labour and Colonialism, NLI Research Study Series 049 / 2003, Noida: V. V. Giri National Labour Institute

3.     Chakravarti, A. K. (1973). Green Revolution in India. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 63 (3),pp.319-330.

Dantwala, M. L., (1979), Agricultural Policy in India since Independence, in Shah C. H. (ed.) Agricultural Development of India: Policy and Problems, Orient Longman, Bombay

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     Ramakumar, R, (2010), Continuity and Change: Notes on Agriculture in ‘New India’. In Anthony D’Costa (ed.), A New India? Critical Perspectives in the Long Twentieth Century, Anthem Press, London.

2.     Reddy, D. Narasimha & Srijit Mishra (2009) (ed.). Agrarian crisis in India, New Delhi

3.     Schultz, Theodore (1974). Transforming Traditional Agriculture, New Haven: Yale University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Students are evaluated on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessment. Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

End Semester Examination (ESE)                                      :           50%

Mid Semester Examination (CIA-2)                                   :           25%

Continuous Internal Assessments (CIA- 1 & 3)                 :           20%

Attendance                                                                             :           05%

Total                                                   :          100%                         

·         Written Examinations consists of:

Mid Semester Exam – 50 marks (2 hours’ duration)

End Semester Exam – 100 marks (3 hours’ duration)

·         A student should have secured minimum 40% marks in the ESE to pass in that paper.

·         In aggregate for each paper, for internal and end semester put together, at least 40 marks out of 100 must be secured to pass in that paper

MPP233 - PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course orients students with mechanisms of public administration that are fundamental to effective policy making 

Learning Outcome

On completing the course students will be able to:

1.     Define key concepts in public administration

2.     Understand the role pf public institutions in the policy process

3.     Analyze models of and approaches to public administration

 

            4. Evaluate the functioning of public administrative institutions in India

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Public Administration
 

Good Governance: concept and application; New Public Management.

Weber’s bureaucratic model its critique and post-Weberian Developments; Human Relations School (Elton Mayo and others); Simon’s decision-making theory; Participative Management (R. Likert, C. Argyris, D. McGregor.)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
: Structural Framework of Administration
 

Ministries and Departments, Boards and Commissions; Dicey on Administrative law; 

Delegated legislation; ‘Anti-development thesis’; Bureaucracy and development;  Administrative ethics.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Issues with Accountability and Control
 

Values in public service; Regulatory Commissions; National Human Rights Commission; Problems of administration in coalition regimes; Citizen administration interface; Corruption and administration; Disaster management. Impact of liberalization on administration in developing countries; PM Cares Fund: Debates and issues

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Policy Formulation in Public Administration
 

Administration and politics in different countries; •   The machinery of planning; Role, composition, and functions of the Planning Commission and the National Development Council; ‘Indicative’ planning; Process of plan formulation at Union and State levels; Constitutional Amendments (1992) and decentralized planning for economic development and social justice

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Policy Implementation by Administrators
 

Changing role of the Collector; Union-State-local relations; Imperatives of development management and law and order administration;  74th Constitutional Amendment; Important Committees and Commissions; 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Global trends in Public Administration
 

Global-local debate; New localism; Development dynamics, politics and administration with special reference to city management. Women and development - the self-help group movement. Reforms in financial management and human resource development; 

Problems of implementation

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     Bhattacharya, M. (2018). New Horizons of Public Administration. Jawahar Publishers & Distributors.

2.     Prasad, D. and Prasad, V. (1980). Administrative Thinkers. Sterling Publishers Pvt Limited.

3.     Sharma, M. and Sadana, B. (2019). Public Administration In Theory And Practice. 48th ed. Kitab Mahal.

Arora, R. (1996). Comparative Public Administration. 2nd ed. NEW DELHI: ASSOCIATED PUBLISHING HO.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     Baker R J S. (1972). Administrative Theory and Public Administration. Huthinson, London

2.     Barnard, Chester. (1969). The Functions of Executive, Cambridge, Harvard University Pres

3.     Donald Menzel and Harvey White (eds) (2011). The State of Public Administration: Issues, Challenges and Opportunity. New York: M. E. Sharpe.

4.     Jay M. Shafritz (ed) (1998), International Encyclopedia of Public Policy and Administration, Westview Press

5.     Luther Gulick & Lyndall Urwick (eds.)(1937), Papers on Science of Administration, New York Institution of Public Administration, New York

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern for Theory Core Papers

Students are evaluated on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessment. Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

End Semester Examination (ESE)                                      :           50%

Mid Semester Examination (CIA-2)                                   :           25%

Continuous Internal Assessments (CIA- 1 & 3)                 :           20%

Attendance                                                                             :           05%

Total                                                   :          100%                         

·         Written Examinations consists of:

Mid Semester Exam – 50 marks (2 hours’ duration)

End Semester Exam – 100 marks (3 hours’ duration)

·         A student should have secured minimum 40% marks in the ESE to pass in that paper.

·         In aggregate for each paper, for internal and end semester put together, at least 40 marks out of 100 must be secured to pass in that paper

MPP234 - SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES OF SOCIAL CHANGE-I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course builds a sociological framework for students to analyze policy-making within

Learning Outcome

On completing the course students will be able to:

1.     Assess changes in society through theoretical frameworks

2.     Examine the impact of policy on social structure

3.     Analyze the role of social institutions in the policy process

Critique state policies through a sociological lens

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Theoretical frameworks
 

Modernity and emergence of sociology. Sociology as Science:

Scientific method and critique. Positivism and its critique. Fact value and objectivity. Non- positivist methodologies. 

Historical materialism, mode of production, alienation, class struggle.

Division of labour, social facts, Social action, ideal types, Social system, pattern variables.

Latent and manifest functions, conformity and deviance, reference groups, Self and identity.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
Sociological Problem emergence
 

Equality, inequality, hierarchy, exclusion, poverty and deprivation

Theories of social stratification- Structural functionalist theory, Marxist theory, Weberian theory. Social stratification of class, status groups, gender, ethnicity and race.

Social mobility- open and closed systems, types of mobility, sources and causes of mobility.

 

Social organization of work in different types of society- slave society, feudal society, industrial /capitalist society. Formal and informal organization of work Labour and society

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Framing of Policy issues with research methods
 

Qualitative and quantitative methods. Techniques of data collection. Variables, sampling, hypothesis, reliability and validity.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Social institutions as Policy intervention
 

Politics and Society:
Theories of power. Power elite, bureaucracy, pressure groups, and political parties. Nation, state, citizenship, democracy, civil society, ideology. Protest, agitation, social movements, collective action, revolution.

Religion and Society:
Theories of religion. Types of religious practices: animism, monism, pluralism, sects, cults.
Religion in modern society: religion and science, secularization, religious revivalism, fundamentalism.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
The role of family in Policy formulation and intervention
 

Kinship:
Family, household, marriage. Types and forms of family. Lineage and descent Patriarchy and sexual division of labour. Contemporary trends.

 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Kinship: Family, household, marriage. Types and forms of family. Lineage and descent Patriarchy and sexual division of labour. Contemporary trends.
 

Theories of social change. the direction of social change and the causes of social change.
Process of Social Change: Social evolution and progress
Development and dependency. Agents of social change. Education and social change. Science, technology and social change

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     Bottomore, T., & Bottomore, T. B. (1987). Sociology: A Guide to Problems and Literature (3rd ed.). Routledge.

2.     Scott, J. (2014). A Dictionary of Sociology (Oxford Quick Reference) (4th ed.). OUP Oxford.

3.     Abraham, F. M. (1983). Modern Sociological Theory: An Introduction (1st ed.). Oxford University Press.

4.     Parsons, T., & Smelser, N. J. (2012). The Social System. Quid Pro, LLC.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     Giddens, A., & Sutton, P. W. (2021). Sociology (9th ed.). Polity.

2. Ritzer, G. (2020). The McDonaldization of Society: Into the Digital Age (Tenth ed.). SAGE Publications, Inc.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern for Theory Core Papers

Students are evaluated on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessment. Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

End Semester Examination (ESE)                                      :           50%

Mid Semester Examination (CIA-2)                                   :           25%

Continuous Internal Assessments (CIA- 1 & 3)                 :           20%

Attendance                                                                             :           05%

Total                                                   :          100%                         

·         Written Examinations consists of:

Mid Semester Exam – 50 marks (2 hours’ duration)

End Semester Exam – 100 marks (3 hours’ duration)

·         A student should have secured minimum 40% marks in the ESE to pass in that paper.

·         In aggregate for each paper, for internal and end semester put together, at least 40 marks out of 100 must be secured to pass in that paper

MPP235 - RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Business and management research involves undertaking systematic research to find out decision outcomes. It is trans-disciplinary, and engages with both theory and practice. The course intends to provide comprehensive knowledge & skills about the research methods that are employed to investigate problems in business.

Learning Outcome

By the end of the course the learner will be able:

1.     Explain the overall process of designing a research study from its inception to its report

2.     Discuss the primary characteristics of quantitative research and qualitative research

3.     Conduct a literature review for a scholarly educational study

4.     Critically analyze research methodologies identified in existing literature

5.     Develop a comprehensive research methodology for a research question

6.     Organize and conduct research in a more appropriate manner

Discuss ethical issues in educational research, including those issues that arise in using quantitative and qualitative research

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
: Introduction to Research:
 

Meaning, Objectives, Types of research, significance of research, research process, criteria of good research, Review of Literature, Identification, selection and Defining research problem.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Research and Sampling Design
 

Meaning, Need for research design, features of a good design, Different Research Designs.

Sampling Design: Census and sample survey, steps in sampling design, criteria of selecting a sampling procedure, characteristics of a good sample design, different types of sampling designs- Probability and Non-Probability Sampling Design, Sampling v/s Non-Sampling Error; Determination of Sample Size.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Data Collection, measurement and scaling
 

Qualitative methods of data collection, attitude measurement and scaling-types of measurement scale, attitude, classification of scales - Single Item v/s Multi Item Scales, Comparative v/s Non-Comparative scales, Continuous Rating Scales; Criteria for Good Measurement, questionnaire design.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Data Processing and Analysis
 

Data Preparation, Field Validation, Data editing, Coding, Content Analysis, Classification and Tabulation of Data. Basic data analysis: Descriptive Statistics, Univariate and Bivariate Statistical Analysis (concepts), Parametric & Non-Parametric Tests; Null & Alternative Hypothesis, Error in Testing of Hypothesis, Critical Region, Degrees of Freedom, One Tailed & Two Tailed Tests, Standard Error; Procedure for Testing of Hypothesis. Parametric test, Non parametric test. Data analysis using SPSS

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Research Report Writing
 

Ethics in research – plagiarism, Types of Research Report, Report Structure, Report Writing: Report Formulation, Citation and Referencing styles Guidelines for effective Documentation and visual representation (Graphs) and Research Briefing –Oral Presentation 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.             Kothari C.K. (2004). Research Methodology – Methods and Techniques. New Delhi: New Age International.

2. Krishnswamy, K.N., Shivkumar, Appa Iyer and Mathiranjan M. (2006). Management Research Methodology; Integration of Principles, Methods and Techniques. New Delhi: Pearson Education. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.             Deepak Chawla, Neena Sondhi. Research Methodology Concepts and Cases. Vikas Publishing.

2.             William Zikmund, Barry Babin, Jon Carr, Mitch Griffin. Business Research Methods.   Cengage.

3.             Naval Bajpai. Business Research Methods. Pearson Education

4. Donald R Cooper and Pamela S Schindler. Business Research Methods. Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Company Ltd

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern for Theory Core Papers

Students are evaluated on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessment. Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

End Semester Examination (ESE)                                      :           50%

Mid Semester Examination (CIA-2)                                   :           25%

Continuous Internal Assessments (CIA- 1 & 3)                 :           20%

Attendance                                                                             :           05%

Total                                                   :          100%                         

·         Written Examinations consists of:

Mid Semester Exam – 50 marks (2 hours’ duration)

End Semester Exam – 100 marks (3 hours’ duration)

·         A student should have secured minimum 40% marks in the ESE to pass in that paper.

·         In aggregate for each paper, for internal and end semester put together, at least 40 marks out of 100 must be secured to pass in that paper

MPP236 - ADVANCED ECONOMICS-I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course orients students with mechanisms of public administration that are fundamental to effective policy making 

Learning Outcome

On completing the course students will be able to:

1.     Evaluate the merits of major economic policies formulated on a global level

2.     Analyze policy decisions in the framework of advanced economic models

3.     Examine the role of institutions in economy stabilization

4.  Dispute the functioning of economic policy against welfare indicators

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Theoretical structures in Micro and Macro Economics
 

Micro-Economics: Price determination. Alternative Distribution Theories; Markets Structure and Modern Welfare Criteria. Related Theorems
Macro-economics

Macro-Economics: Approaches to Employment Income and Interest Rate determination:

Classical,Keynes (IS)-LM) curve, Neo-classical synthesis and New classical,

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Policy considerations in Framework for Economic Policy
 

(a) Demand for and Supply of Money: Related theories

Goals and Instruments of Monetary Management in Closed and Open Economies.

Proposal for ceiling on the growth rate of money.


(b) Public Finance and its Role in Market Economy: Stabilization of supply, allocation of resources and in distribution and development.

Forms of Taxes and Subsidies, their incidence and effects. Limits to taxation, loans, crowding-out effects, and limits to borrowings. Public expenditure and its effects. Petrol prices in India Case study

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Global models of Economic Policy Formulation
 

Old and New theories of International Trade.

Comparative advantage, Terms of Trade and Offer Curve. Product Cycle and Strategic Trade Theories.

Protectionism: Tariffs, quotas and other modes

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Economic adjustments in policy implementation
 

Balance of Payments Adjustment: Alternative Approaches. Price versus income, income adjustments under fixed exchange rates. Theories of Policy Mix.

Exchange rate adjustments under capital mobility.

Floating Rates and their Implications for Developing Countries : Currency Boards.

Trade Policy and Developing Countries. BOP, adjustments and Policy Coordination in open economy macro model. Speculative attacks.

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Global bodies for economic policy review
 

Trade Blocks and Monetary Unions.
WTO: TRIMS, TRIPS, Domestic Measures, Different Rounds of WTO talks.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Review of impact of Economic Policy trade-offs
 

Theories of growth : Review under theoretical models. Process of Economic Development of less developed courtries: Impact of Economic Development and International Trade and Investment on developed and developing countries

 

Welfare indicators and measures of growth. Human Development Indices.

The basic needs approach.

Development and Environmental Sustainability: Renewable and Non-renewable Resources,

Environmental Degradation, Intergenerational equity development.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     Meier, B. G. M. (1966). Economic Development. John Wiley and Sons.

2.     Samuelson, P., & Nordhaus, W. (2009). Economics (19th ed.). McGraw-Hill

3.     Education..

4.     Salvatore,Dominick (2021). International Economics. [2003,8th Edition.] Hardcover. WiIey.

5.     Shapiro, E. (1982). Macroeconomic analysis (5th ed.). Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

6.     Kurihara, K. K. (2007). Monetary Theory and Public Policy (1st ed.). Routledge.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     Gruber, J. (2019). Public Finance and Public Policy (Sixth ed.). Worth Publishers.

2. Banerjee, A., & Duflo, E. (2019). Good Economics for Hard Times. PublicAffairs.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern for Theory Core Papers

Students are evaluated on the basis of written examination and continuous internal assessment. Each paper carries maximum of 100 marks and is evaluated as follows:

End Semester Examination (ESE)                                      :           50%

Mid Semester Examination (CIA-2)                                   :           25%

Continuous Internal Assessments (CIA- 1 & 3)                 :           20%

Attendance                                                                             :           05%

Total                                                   :          100%                         

·         Written Examinations consists of:

Mid Semester Exam – 50 marks (2 hours’ duration)

End Semester Exam – 100 marks (3 hours’ duration)

·         A student should have secured minimum 40% marks in the ESE to pass in that paper.

·         In aggregate for each paper, for internal and end semester put together, at least 40 marks out of 100 must be secured to pass in that paper

MPP251 - SKILL ENHANCEMENT-II (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces and equips students with important tools from history, geography and science as approaches to policy making

Learning Outcome

On completing the course students will be able to:

  1. Evaluate the role of non-human determinants of policy
  2. Identify and explain the historical, geographical and social aspects of the policy process.
  3. Discuss tools and analytical models for policy-makers 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
1. Counterfactual analysis and Classifying History
 

History of India & Indian National Movement.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Geographic Information System Mapping
 

Indian & World Geography – Physical, Social, Economic Geography of India & the World

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Organizational Configuration
 

Indian Polity & Governance – Constitution, Political System, Panchayati Raj, Public Policy, Rights Issues

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Life-cycle assessment
 

Economic & Social Development – Sustainable Development, Poverty, Inclusion, Demographics, Social Sector Initiatives, etc.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Ecosystem-services valuation
 

General issues on Environmental ecology, Bio-diversity & climate change. General Science.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. L, G. (2013). New Look At Modern Indian History (From 1707 To The Modern Times). S. Chand & Company LTD.

 

2. Ahuja, R. (2021). SOCIAL PROBLEMS IN INDIA (Fourth Edition). Rawat.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. L, G. (2013). New Look At Modern Indian History (From 1707 To The Modern Times). S. Chand & Company LTD.

 

Ahuja, R. (2021). SOCIAL PROBLEMS IN INDIA (Fourth Edition). Rawat.

Evaluation Pattern

Total Marks: 50

CIA 1:10 Marks

CIA 2:25 Marks

CIA 3: 10 Marks

Attendance: 5 Marks